Browning .50 BMG

"Cartridge cases are piling up by the thousands in the Army’s arsenals. These have just come out of production at the Frankford Arsenal Philadelphia."

A munitions worker poses with cases of .50 BMG cartridges, the empty casings were piled up ready to be filled and primed.  The .50 BMG was developed from the US army’s standard cartridge the .30-06 when the commander of  the American Expeditionary Force General John J. Pershing requested a bullet large enough to be an efficient anti-aircraft weapon.
John Browning began development of scaling up the .30-06 and the M2 Browning heavy machine gun entered US service in 1932 and has been in continuous service in numerous roles ever since.  The powerful cartridge and the heavy bullet make the .50 BMG an extremely accurate round which is also well suited to sniping.  While modern heavy rifles like the Barrett M95 are chambered in .50 the first use of the cartridge for long range snipping actually occurred during the Vietnam war when Carlos Hancock used an M2 mounted with a scope to make the then longest range confirmed kill in history at a range of 2500 yards, well beyond the M2's reliable effective range.
Source Browning .50 BMG

"Cartridge cases are piling up by the thousands in the Army’s arsenals. These have just come out of production at the Frankford Arsenal Philadelphia."

A munitions worker poses with cases of .50 BMG cartridges, the empty casings were piled up ready to be filled and primed.  The .50 BMG was developed from the US army’s standard cartridge the .30-06 when the commander of  the American Expeditionary Force General John J. Pershing requested a bullet large enough to be an efficient anti-aircraft weapon.
John Browning began development of scaling up the .30-06 and the M2 Browning heavy machine gun entered US service in 1932 and has been in continuous service in numerous roles ever since.  The powerful cartridge and the heavy bullet make the .50 BMG an extremely accurate round which is also well suited to sniping.  While modern heavy rifles like the Barrett M95 are chambered in .50 the first use of the cartridge for long range snipping actually occurred during the Vietnam war when Carlos Hancock used an M2 mounted with a scope to make the then longest range confirmed kill in history at a range of 2500 yards, well beyond the M2's reliable effective range.
Source

Browning .50 BMG

"Cartridge cases are piling up by the thousands in the Army’s arsenals. These have just come out of production at the Frankford Arsenal Philadelphia."

A munitions worker poses with cases of .50 BMG cartridges, the empty casings were piled up ready to be filled and primed.  The .50 BMG was developed from the US army’s standard cartridge the .30-06 when the commander of  the American Expeditionary Force General John J. Pershing requested a bullet large enough to be an efficient anti-aircraft weapon.

John Browning began development of scaling up the .30-06 and the M2 Browning heavy machine gun entered US service in 1932 and has been in continuous service in numerous roles ever since.  The powerful cartridge and the heavy bullet make the .50 BMG an extremely accurate round which is also well suited to sniping.  While modern heavy rifles like the Barrett M95 are chambered in .50 the first use of the cartridge for long range snipping actually occurred during the Vietnam war when Carlos Hancock used an M2 mounted with a scope to make the then longest range confirmed kill in history at a range of 2500 yards, well beyond the M2's reliable effective range.

Source