Defence of the Falklands
A month before the British Task Force to retake the Falklands was launched the Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 offered up the Falklands only resistance to the overwhelming Argentinian invasion. They were forced to surrender outside Government House after several hours of fighting. Argentine Commandos (pictured above) landed in the early hours of April 2nd ahead of the main invasion force and attacked the Marine Barracks and Government House. The Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 were not in the barracks and the next day after engaging advancing Argentine Amtraks on the road to Port Stanley they fell back to Government House defending it for several hours, killing one Argentine Officer and wounding several of the enemy, before surrendering in the morning.
The photos above of the Royal Marines being searched and laying prone in the street galvanised the British public’s support for an expedition to recapture the Islands. The Argentine’s had intended the photos to show how none of the Marines were killed or wounded in the hopes that Britain would decide to negotiate rather than intervene militarily. They were wrong and before the end of April the Task Force had been organised and was underway. Defence of the Falklands
A month before the British Task Force to retake the Falklands was launched the Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 offered up the Falklands only resistance to the overwhelming Argentinian invasion. They were forced to surrender outside Government House after several hours of fighting. Argentine Commandos (pictured above) landed in the early hours of April 2nd ahead of the main invasion force and attacked the Marine Barracks and Government House. The Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 were not in the barracks and the next day after engaging advancing Argentine Amtraks on the road to Port Stanley they fell back to Government House defending it for several hours, killing one Argentine Officer and wounding several of the enemy, before surrendering in the morning.
The photos above of the Royal Marines being searched and laying prone in the street galvanised the British public’s support for an expedition to recapture the Islands. The Argentine’s had intended the photos to show how none of the Marines were killed or wounded in the hopes that Britain would decide to negotiate rather than intervene militarily. They were wrong and before the end of April the Task Force had been organised and was underway. Defence of the Falklands
A month before the British Task Force to retake the Falklands was launched the Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 offered up the Falklands only resistance to the overwhelming Argentinian invasion. They were forced to surrender outside Government House after several hours of fighting. Argentine Commandos (pictured above) landed in the early hours of April 2nd ahead of the main invasion force and attacked the Marine Barracks and Government House. The Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 were not in the barracks and the next day after engaging advancing Argentine Amtraks on the road to Port Stanley they fell back to Government House defending it for several hours, killing one Argentine Officer and wounding several of the enemy, before surrendering in the morning.
The photos above of the Royal Marines being searched and laying prone in the street galvanised the British public’s support for an expedition to recapture the Islands. The Argentine’s had intended the photos to show how none of the Marines were killed or wounded in the hopes that Britain would decide to negotiate rather than intervene militarily. They were wrong and before the end of April the Task Force had been organised and was underway.

Defence of the Falklands

A month before the British Task Force to retake the Falklands was launched the Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 offered up the Falklands only resistance to the overwhelming Argentinian invasion. They were forced to surrender outside Government House after several hours of fighting. Argentine Commandos (pictured above) landed in the early hours of April 2nd ahead of the main invasion force and attacked the Marine Barracks and Government House. The Royal Marines of Naval Party 8901 were not in the barracks and the next day after engaging advancing Argentine Amtraks on the road to Port Stanley they fell back to Government House defending it for several hours, killing one Argentine Officer and wounding several of the enemy, before surrendering in the morning.

The photos above of the Royal Marines being searched and laying prone in the street galvanised the British public’s support for an expedition to recapture the Islands. The Argentine’s had intended the photos to show how none of the Marines were killed or wounded in the hopes that Britain would decide to negotiate rather than intervene militarily. They were wrong and before the end of April the Task Force had been organised and was underway.